Dupuytren’s Fasciectomy Surgery

Treatment of Dupuytren’s Contracture

You may not need treatment for Dupuytren’s contracture if the condition is not affecting your ability to perform daily activities. However, if you are experiencing pain or are having difficulty using your hands for everyday activities, your surgeon will recommend conservative treatment options to treat your condition. Treatment options will vary depending on the severity of the condition. The conservative approaches include:

  • Heat: Applying heat to the palms of the hand prior to massage or exercise can help to loosen the tissues.
  • Massage: Gently massage the thickened tissues of the palm.
  • Exercises: Stretching exercises such as bending the fingers away from the palm may be useful.
  • Injections: Steroid injections in the palm may be done to relieve local inflammation.
  • Collagenase Injection: An enzymatic drug that breaks down collagen can be injected into the corded tissue to soften and weaken the contracture. The physician then manipulates the area manually to break up the tissue.
  • Needle Aponeurotomy: This procedure involves inserting a small needle into the thickened palm tissue and manipulating it to loosen and break up the contracting tissue. Ultrasound may be used to guide the needle to avoid hitting nerves or tendons

Surgical Procedure

If conservative treatment options fail to resolve the condition and symptoms persist for 6 months or more and your quality of life is adversely affected, your surgeon may recommend a surgical procedure to open the tendon sheath and allow more room for tendon movement.

This surgery is usually performed in an operating room under local or regional anaesthesia on an outpatient basis as day surgery. Your surgeon makes a small incision to the affected palm area.

The surgeon then removes the thickened fibrous tissue causing the contracture.

The incision is then closed with sutures and covered with a sterile dressing.

Complications

Complications can be medical (general) or specific to hand surgery. Medical complications include those of the anaesthetic and your general well-being. Some of the complications associated with hand surgery include:

  • Infection
  • Nerve damage causing weakness, paralysis or loss of feeling in the hand area
  • Injury to the arteries of the fingers/hand
  • Recurrence of the condition

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Mr Stephen Lipscombe

Mr Stephen Lipscombe

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